Yanweizhou Park, Sponge Cities project.

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Cities Are Turning Flood Water Into Freshwater

As a guest on NPR’s “Science Friday,” Erica talks about sponge cities in China and the ways in which several cities around the world are adapting to be more resilient, as climate change begins to have a major effect on water systems.

Amuna in the highlands of Peru.

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Slow Water in Peru

As drought grips Peru, its people are turning to nature, and ancient pre-Incan techniques to conserve water for the dry season that’s grown increasingly intense due to climate change. Erica discusses this world-leading program with Top of Mind host Julie Rose.

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After Ida – Paths to Flash Flood Safety

What can be done to better warn and prepare communities everywhere for flash flooding, an intensifying threat in a human-heated climate? Erica joins a conversation on Andy Revkin’s Sustain What Live following the September 2021 flooding in New York City.

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As the Water Crisis Deepens, California Finally Passes Groundwater Regulation

California, the only western U.S. state without groundwater regulation, appears poised to change that. But farmers argue regulation would infringe on their property rights.

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10 Riskiest Places to Buy Your Seaside Dream Home

As sea levels rise, real estate investments in these seaside metropolises could amount to throwing money into the sea

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The Business Cost of Climate Change: What the Science Says

Massive loss from extreme weather in recent years abound, and new research indicates climate risks aren’t leaving any time soon.

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12 Ways Communities Will Have to Adapt to Handle Climate Change

Whatever your water crisis, whether drought or flood, these DIY solutions will help you adjust to climate change’s new reality.

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Value from Sewage? A New Technology Cleans Up Waste Water

Clean water startup Ostara has built a new sewage treatment technology that reduces water pollution and saves money

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Water Tech Startup Aims to Green Manure at Factory Farms

Manure from livestock farms can be environmentally damaging. A new treatment system could clean up its impact, but will that just hide deeper problems in an unsustainable industry?

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Clean Energy Soared in the U.S. in 2017 Due to Economics, Policy and Technology

President Trump rolled out the antiquated arguments about why clean energy was too expensive and a threat to the grid. But markets and policies mostly ignored him.

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Electric Trucks Begin Reporting for Duty, Quietly and Without All the Fumes

Replacing fleets of medium- and heavy-duty trucks can help cut greenhouse gas emissions and make cities quieter and cleaner.

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Microgrids Keep These Cities Running When the Power Goes Out

These energy islands are keeping electricity flowing in emergencies and helping integrate wind and solar. They’re keystones to a modern electric grid.

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Californians Are Keeping Dirty Energy Off the Grid via Text Message

When power demand rises, OhmConnect sends out a text to customers: cut your energy use and you’ll earn money. It’s keeping demand spikes under control.

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Are Electric Vehicles Pushing Oil Demand Over a Cliff?

With China now planning to phase out gas-powered cars, automakers are talking about an all-electric future. It could mean a big drop in emissions.

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Procter & Gamble Touts ‘Win-Win’ of Cutting Phosphates in All Laundry Soaps

Global waterways, especially in developing countries, are set to benefit as the Tide manufacturer aims to cut phosphates from all its laundry soaps within two years.

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Greenpeace Report on P&G’s Palm Oil Sources Could Spur Industry Change

By calling out the consumer goods giant on its sourcing practices, the campaign group hopes that other corporations will start to clean up their supply chains.

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Mom and Pop Forests Struggle to Make Sustainable Harvesting Pay

For family foresters, managing a wood lot means striking a balance between a living legacy and a complex business.

Percolation pond in Arizona. Photo by Erica Gies.

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Water in the Bank: One Solution For Drought-Stricken California

A potential answer to California’s severe water shortages is groundwater banking, which involves creating incentives for municipalities, farmers, and other water users to percolate water down into sub-surface aquifers for later use.

Solar panels on Kauai. Photo by Erica Gies.

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Will New Obstacles Dim Hawaii’s Solar Power Surge?

Blessed with lots of sun and keen to cut its reliance on imported oil, Hawaii has moved to the forefront of residential solar installations in the U.S. But financial and technical hurdles are slowing the state’s drive to generate 40 percent of its electricity from renewable energy by 2030.

Poet Plant.

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For Cellulosic Ethanol Makers, The Road Ahead Is Still Uphill

While it has environmental advantages over other forms of ethanol, cellulosic ethanol has proven difficult to produce at commercial scale. Even as new production facilities come online in the U.S., a variety of economic and market realities suggest the new fuel still has big challenges to overcome.

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