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Californians Are Keeping Dirty Energy Off the Grid via Text Message

When power demand rises, OhmConnect sends out a text to customers: cut your energy use and you’ll earn money. It’s keeping demand spikes under control.

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Are Electric Vehicles Pushing Oil Demand Over a Cliff?

With China now planning to phase out gas-powered cars, automakers are talking about an all-electric future. It could mean a big drop in emissions.

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Procter & Gamble Touts ‘Win-Win’ of Cutting Phosphates in All Laundry Soaps

Global waterways, especially in developing countries, are set to benefit as the Tide manufacturer aims to cut phosphates from all its laundry soaps within two years.

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Greenpeace Report on P&G’s Palm Oil Sources Could Spur Industry Change

By calling out the consumer goods giant on its sourcing practices, the campaign group hopes that other corporations will start to clean up their supply chains.

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Mom and Pop Forests Struggle to Make Sustainable Harvesting Pay

For family foresters, managing a wood lot means striking a balance between a living legacy and a complex business.

Percolation pond in Arizona. Photo by Erica Gies.

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Water in the Bank: One Solution For Drought-Stricken California

A potential answer to California’s severe water shortages is groundwater banking, which involves creating incentives for municipalities, farmers, and other water users to percolate water down into sub-surface aquifers for later use.

Solar panels on Kauai. Photo by Erica Gies.

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Will New Obstacles Dim Hawaii’s Solar Power Surge?

Blessed with lots of sun and keen to cut its reliance on imported oil, Hawaii has moved to the forefront of residential solar installations in the U.S. But financial and technical hurdles are slowing the state’s drive to generate 40 percent of its electricity from renewable energy by 2030.

Poet Plant.

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For Cellulosic Ethanol Makers, The Road Ahead Is Still Uphill

While it has environmental advantages over other forms of ethanol, cellulosic ethanol has proven difficult to produce at commercial scale. Even as new production facilities come online in the U.S., a variety of economic and market realities suggest the new fuel still has big challenges to overcome.

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Expanding Paved Areas Has an Outsize Effect on Urban Flooding

Researchers have finally been able to pinpoint just how much impervious surfaces exacerbate flood levels

Hawaiis Ancient Aquaculture Revival

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Hawaii’s Ancient Aquaculture Revival

In an ocean state that now imports half of its seafood, a determined group of activists is restoring the age-old aquaculture practices of Native Hawaiians.

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Northern Cyprus Sees Hope in Water Pipeline

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Private Funding Brings a Boom in Hydropower, With High Costs

The Real Cost of Energy

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The Real Cost of Energy

All energy production has environmental and societal effects. But calculating them — and pricing energy accordingly — is no easy task.

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Heading Off Negative Impacts of Dam Projects

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Water Adds New Constraints to Power

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Turning to Water Conservation to Save Energy

The giant water lily, Victoria amazonica, can hold the weight of a child and is the national flower of Guyana. The flower blooms white, attracts gold beetles that night for a big party inside, and turns intense pink the next day. Photo by Erica Gies.

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Guyana Offers a Model to Save Rain Forest

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A Clash Over Mining and Water

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Ethanol Boom Creates Environmental Impact

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